Aid Worker Burnout and Recovery Study Results

Published by ReAllocate on

Key findings: 

  • Burnout was prevalent in the aid-worker population. 
  • The more symptoms of burnout an aid worker had, the more pain was reported.
  • Slow Wave reduced this pain by 80%.
  • Slow Wave fully eliminated ALL reported pain in nearly 60% of pain sufferers.
  • Slow Wave reduced anxiety by 23%.
  • 100% of participants showed a rebalancing of the autonomic nervous system, lessening the “fight or flight” response and improving parasympathetic tone.
  • During the Slow Wave protocol, peak heart rate variability increased by an average of 250%.

For those directly harmed in a humanitarian crisis, their individual needs are numerous, and collectively these needs themselves overwhelm those who rush towards the emergency to provide logistics, medical care, food, shelter, and transportation. The responders who stand up this crisis response network must cope with this vast collective need, navigate a chaotic and frequently changing situation, create on the fly a seamless system of care among multiple responding organizations, and simultaneously provide for their own personal needs.

In the early days of the Ukrainian crisis, adrenaline fueled these aid workers–. Ssleep and food were less necessary, the mind was sharp, and energy was plentiful. Service to others overrode all other interests. As one American volunteer at the Ukrainian border crossing stated, “I, like many who show up to serve in crises, deprioritized myself, my self-care, my future concerns.” Yet, as time goes on, these aid workers inevitably lose effectiveness themselves. The accumulated effects of broken sleep, frequent interruption, stress, pain, and fatigue rapidly take their toll. 

This inevitably leads to burnout.

           During the creation and testing of the Slow Wave, the data spoke strongly that this novel device rapidly reverses the underlying physiology of the chronic stress response and restores physical and mental well-being. This was shown in American first responders, military personnel, and healthcare workers during COVID-19.

            When the Ukrainian homeland was invaded, and the world mobilized to assist the refugees, ReAllocate brought these devices thousands of miles to the effort. We did this to provide direct assistance to the refugees. But, because helping the helpers is a powerful force multiplier, we also brought Slow Wave to Poland and Ukraine to the aid workers themselves. As with any deeply science-driven effort, we also collected voluntary data from these aid workers to determine if our proposed assistance was truly effective in the real-world chaos of such a response. 

            Now, the results are in, and our hypothetical hope was deeply validated. Our study of Slow Wave’s effectiveness forin aid workers at the Polish border showed profound positive effects on body and mind after just a single session.

As the aforementioned American border-crossing volunteer stated after his Slow Wave protocol:

Physically and emotionally after my session, I feel at ease, weightless, calm…ready to gto back to the chaos with a fresh perspective.”

Seeing these results, how effective Slow Wave was for rapid mind-body restoration, we endeavored to get a system into Ukraine itself. One system now is in a town in Central Ukraine, assisting and revitalizing the drivers tirelessly evacuating women and children from the war’s front lines. 

As once such Ukrainian rescue driver stated after his Slow Wave session:

Stress is gone. Feels very good, and brain, head gets a relief. It was jammed before and after it gets released, relaxed, the tightness goes away. Thanks, it is just super. For our guys it will be a huge help. For those guys who save people who save kids. Thanks. I am sincerely grateful from the bottom of my heart. 

The data is clear on the benefits of Slow Wave in this crisis. 

Please donate to extend this revitalizing technology to more Ukrainian responders.  

Categories: Slow Wave